V&A

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Time Out says

Posted: Mon Jul 21 2014

The V&A is one of the world’s – let alone London’s – most magnificent museums, its foundation stone laid on this site by Queen Victoria in her last official public engagement in 1899. It is a superb showcase for applied arts from around the world, appreciably calmer than its tearaway cousins on the other side of Exhibition Road. Some 150 grand galleries on seven floors contain countless pieces of furniture, ceramics, sculpture, paintings, posters, jewellery, metalwork, glass, textiles and dress, spanning several centuries. Items are grouped by theme, origin or age: for advice, tap the patient staff, who field a formidable combination of leaflets, floor plans, general knowledge and polite concern.

Highlights include the seven Raphael Cartoons painted in 1515 as tapestry designs for the Sistine Chapel; the finest collection of Italian Renaissance sculpture outside Italy; the Ardabil carpet, the world’s oldest and arguably most splendid floor covering, in the Jameel Gallery of Islamic Art; and the Luck of Edenhall, a thirteenth-century glass beaker from Syria. The Fashion galleries run from eighteenth-century court dress right up to contemporary chiffon numbers; the Architecture gallery has videos, models, plans and descriptions of various styles; and the famous Photography collection holds over 500,000 images.

Over more than a decade, the V&A’s on-going FuturePlan transformation has been a revelation. The completely refurbished Medieval & Renaissance Galleries are stunning, but there are many other eye-catching new or redisplayed exhibits: they were preceded by the restored mosaic floors and beautiful stained glass of the fourteenth- to seventeenth-century sculpture rooms, just off the central John Madejski Garden, and followed by the Furniture Galleries – an immediate hit on opening in late 2012. On a smaller scale, the Gilbert Collection of silver, gold and gemmed ornaments arrived from Somerset House; the Ceramics Galleries have been renovated and supplemented with an eye-catching bridge; there’s lovely Buddhist sculpture in the Robert HN Ho Family Foundation Galleries; and the Theatre & Performance Galleries took over where Covent Garden’s defunct Theatre Museum left off.

There’s more to come. The museum’s ‘Rapid Response Collection’ has just gained a new home in Gallery 74, and features examples of contemporary design and architecture, particularly those that represent important events and current affairs, and in December 2014, the latest grand opening will be the ambitious Europe 1600-1800 galleries, which cost £12.5m. A stunning 4m-long table fountain – painstakingly reconstructed from eighteenth-century fragments – is due to form the centrepiece of seven new galleries, taking a chronological and thematic approach to European clothes, furnishings and other artefacts. We’re also looking forward to seeing what’s been done with the magnificent Cast Courts – the public should be allowed back to ogle the 18ft-high plaster David and other monumental sculptures in these double-height Victorian galleries in November 2014.

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